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This American disgrace

Posted in Life & Love

700_rubber-house-black-black.jpgThe alarm clock was set for 6:30 am. I was planning to get up and watch Hillary Clinton’s acceptance speech. At 5:30, my mother woke me up: “You better come have a look. It’s not good.” I bolted out of bed and sat in disbelief until I could muster the strength to make coffee.

I never took into consideration this could happen. Not for a second. I had faith in America – how naive of me.

My stepson texts me “I am scared”. He is white and somewhat privileged.

My country has spoken and is telling us that a black president needs to be wiped off the map. That a woman cannot aspire to the highest elected office. That my Latino friends don’t matter and are not welcome. That stopping at the headlines is enough information to go by.
That it is acceptable to have a groper in chief. That climate change never happened.

Mostly, I am upset that a large part of the country that seemed to have opened up to minorities has come out of the closet, emboldened, and revealed nothing but bigotry and racism. As sofa girl says: humanity has not moved forward.

Friends are texting me from Los Angeles in equal disbelief, in tears, because we cannot see a pathway to sanity for the next four years.

Today, on a cold and gray Italian dawn, I am profoundly ashamed to be an American.

The only upside is that California has legalized marijuana – at least, I can smoke myself into oblivion for the next four years. And plot a Californian secession.

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32 Comments

  1. Honestly, I would have felt all those things everybody said above if Hillary won! I was disgusted by both candidates and felt that because of eight horrible damaging years of very disappointing Democratic government; we, the people, had to make an impossible choice! I personally could not look at myself in the mirror if I gave my vote to perpetrate more of the same. I was so full of hope when I voted for Obama, I never thought that my admiration could turn in contempt: not only for the disaster of the financial collapse of 2008, but the unforgivable association with France and other european countries (including mine) in the shameful “elimination” of Lybia’s Gheddaffi with the horrific consequence of what is happening now in Iraq, Syria and other northern african countries. Sorry, I rather have the incognito of a Trump and the republicans. Never in my life I thought I would say or write something like this: and this is SAD!

    November 14, 2016
    |Reply
    • sofagirl
      sofagirl

      Hey Julie, I can’t tell from this comment whether you did vote and whether that vote was for Donald Trump – but that doesn’t really matter. Your views are your views and I would fight anyone who tried to take away your right to express them. However I do have a couple of thoughts in response to the points you made:
      1. Blaming the Obama Administration for the financial collapse in September 2008 is wide of the mark. The situation had been brewing for a long time and George Bush Junior was incumbent during most of those years. Many economic realists had written dire warnings of what was to come. Had been to the White House to deliver their warnings. The President and the GOP simply ignored them. A look at the response and recovery effected by the Obama Administration, and the sharing of resources and efforts by that Administration with the rest of the world – would give you a more accurate view of their financial acumen.
      2. Gadaffi was a brutal dictator who inflicted four decades of punishment on the country he professed to love. His sons were active participants in the torture of his people and looting of state resources. The Arab Spring started off a movement towards real democracy in Northern Africa. Libyans took the idea and ran with it. Rebels gained footholds all over the region. Gadaffi responded with the Bhengazi massacre – killing hundreds of unarmed protesters. Civil war broke out. Both sides committed human rights abuses, including arbitrary arrests, torture, extrajudicial executions and revenge attacks. People tried to flee. The UN Security Council established a no-fly zone over the country to try and protect regular Libyans. It also prohibited foreign involvement. Qatar, France and the UAE broke that agreement by supplying training and munitions to the National Transition Council. Who ultimately prevailed and were recognised as the official government of Libya by 30 countries in July 2011. The subsequent parading of Gadaffi and his sons through the streets and the images of their broken and tortured bodies splashed across international media was abhorrent and shameful.
      3. The war on terror, on ISIS, on the religious Jihadists and Islamist extremists is complex, messy and composed of many players, histories and reasons. It is peppered with as much self-interest as it is with fanatical behaviour. The US is certainly complicit, without question. As are myriad other countries. All with their own justifications. The horrific consequences you mention are just that and sadden me every single day. The people still in the countries live in chaos and fear. Other desperate people, displaced by war, try to start new lives in countries who are struggling with their own set of problems. Countries who are unwilling or unable to assist. That is the price of war. Worth noting that this northern exodus has been going on for over a decade: in October 2010, the EU paid Libya €50 million to stop African migrants passing into Europe. Gadaffi took the money. Did nothing.
      4. Hillary Clinton let Monica Lewinsky take the fall for Bill Clinton’s bad behaviour. By remaining silent, she consented to the global vilification of a 21 year old woman. To me that said more about her than anything else she has done. What the pact was between the Clintons we will never know for sure – but I suspect it had something to do with Bill supporting Hillary’s political career and this recent attempt at the Presidency. She is a tough cookie – she has had to be to work in politics. She is a smart cookie – she has to be to have survived. She is an experienced cookie – she has put in the hours. She is also a flawed cookie – she is a politician and that always involves choices and alliances that a person may regret. Or that someone from the outside may find abhorrent. But she has never grabbed anyone by the pussy and thought it was her right. She has never suggested building a wall across a section of the country to keep people out, she has never appointed anti-semitic advisors, or spewed racist rhetoric. She would not take away our right to abortion.To marry who we choose. Trump did. Trump will.
      5. History will show whether the Obama years were, in fact, the disaster you feel they have been. As an outsider – I don’t see the two Obama terms as being that. I see honest endeavour, decency, self-management, working with what you have and a divided Congress. In a time of moral free-fall. But, I am an outsider.
      6. We are a world at war – environmentally, economically, idealistically, politically, racially. The rights of women, people of colour, of the poor and of marginalised communities are being decimated. We are devolving. There is no such thing as an incognito President. All of everything is related. Our votes are precious – and to be used in the best possible way we can – so that our true voices can be heard.
      With my warmest regards, Sue

      November 15, 2016
      |Reply
      • winstonmoreton
        winstonmoreton

        This deserves a wider audience

        November 15, 2016
        |Reply
  2. Our only hope is that Trump is more about marketing than management and will tone down the rhetoric once in office. It’s also a simple fact that he isn’t going to be able to do everything he promised, like building a giant wall and making someone else pay for it. That could lead to bitterness and a change of heart on the part of many who supported him.

    Also, remember that it might only be two years, not four, of total domination. Because there’s a good chance Democrats could re-take the House and/or Senate in the next round of elections. As long as they learn a lesson from this fiasco and focus on supporting candidates that generate enthusiasm and downright zeal, the way Trump and even Bernie Sanders did.

    November 14, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      I am hoping your forecast will prove correct. I am also hoping this defeat will inspire more activism on the part of those who tend to stay home.

      November 14, 2016
      |Reply
  3. As a Brit looking on, my thoughts are that Trump is deeply unpleasant as a person and flaky as a politician. The fact that he hadn’t even prepared for transition to office says it all. My hunch, Campari Girl, is that he will turn out to be a damp squib, because many of his electoral promises are unworkable. He’s already backtracking on Obamacare.

    What I do find deeply offensive is that he likens his electoral position to Brexit (in UK). Brexit was pursued honourably by experienced politicians. I’m aware that a few people have taken Brexit as an excuse to commit a few unpleasant racist acts, but, in spite of what the so-called Remoaners say, the vast majority of Brexit supporters just want to get out of the corrupt EU and feel that the UK is better off doing its own thing. Trump has not bothered to learn about British politics, it appears, and he certainly shouldn’t listen to Nigel Farage, whose party David Cameron likened to a fruitcake.

    November 14, 2016
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      You are absolutely correct when you say Trump hasn’t bothered to learn much about Brexit, or anything else for that matter. Watching the debates it was clear there was no depth to him. I am pretty convinced he is over his head and will have to rely on the counsel of people who are infinitely scarier than he is.

      November 14, 2016
      |Reply
    • sofagirl
      sofagirl

      All that the successful Brexit vote proves is that the UK voters are as uninformed as to big picture as are US voters.

      November 15, 2016
      |Reply
  4. winstonmoreton
    winstonmoreton

    I guess that’s democracy. Nevada went your way I believe

    November 9, 2016
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      Yes, I know, it still sucks. I am not as gracious in defeat as Mrs. Clinton or President Obama. Nevada went Democratic too. I believe California had the largest majority of voters for Mrs. Clinton. At least, my chances of having to socialize with Trump supporters are minimized.

      November 10, 2016
      |Reply
    • sofagirl
      sofagirl

      It is democracy, you are spot on. With all of its pimples, flaws and bigots.

      November 15, 2016
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  5. Republicans also got Congress, right? Flying Spaghetti Monster save us all.

    November 9, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      And the Senate. Triple whacking.

      November 9, 2016
      |Reply
  6. While I’m not going to say I thought this might happen, I did not under-estimate the stunning and appalling electorate’s ability to be seduced with lies, fear and ignorance. While Mrs. Clinton was not a perfect candidate (no one ever is), I felt she was certainly the most qualified. Had there been a counter balance with a Democratic Senate to offset what may most likely be an abuse of power, it might have been a less bitter pill to swallow. And that is what is the most disheartening, apart from the election results. As Colorado went blue, maybe the fact that California approved pot will provide some sanity until the cessation. While I’ll be “ok” my greatest fear is for my children and grandchildren. I worry we’ll start bombing Syrian rebels with Russia, drill baby drill, and openly discriminate against gays, people of color, Muslims, and wholeheartedly embrace ignorance and bigotry. America just joined the Flat Earth Society as a charter member, despite Hilary winning the popular vote. As a naturalized citizen, I am wondering how problematic it will be for me to fly my American flag upside down. Who’d have thunk we’d be nostalgic for George W. Bush this morning?

    November 9, 2016
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      What terrifies me most is not so much him per se, but the coterie of frightening idiots and bigots he surrounds himself with. And on whom he will have to rely.

      November 9, 2016
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      • YES, an entire team of Flat Earth members who believe bullying is an effective means by which to govern. So sad. So scary!

        November 9, 2016
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        • sofagirl
          sofagirl

          I’d take flat earthers over this bunch

          November 15, 2016
          |Reply
  7. The numbers 11 and 9 do not seem to go well together. I feel absolutely sick to my stomach. Being Canadian affords me a little comfort, but not much. xx

    November 9, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      Watch out for an influx of my countrymen….we should be given asylum on the grounds of national stupidity.

      November 9, 2016
      |Reply
  8. I too am completely shocked and horrified. American has taken a big step backwards.

    November 9, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      Let’s hope it will not take decades to recover from this.

      November 9, 2016
      |Reply
  9. silvia
    silvia

    Sofagirl is proving wisdom once more.
    So sorry for you my friend and for those Americans who are now mourning and for those who are celebrating because they don’t understand what they did.

    November 9, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      You should be sorry for yourself too. 95% of countries that have relations with the States should worry.

      November 9, 2016
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      • Definitely plenty of worried people here in Australia

        November 9, 2016
        |Reply
  10. I have no words. He is the most unqualified president we have had in ages. GWB was a former governor of the second largest state in America.

    November 9, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      Yes, the bar was already pretty low. Now we have lowered to under sea level.

      November 9, 2016
      |Reply
  11. I empathize with your stepson feeling ‘scared’ …this will be a challenging time However I believe it is our political leaders who should feel the shame. Too many people in this country have felt disenfranchised from our ‘democratic’ government for too long and no one took note – so now the disgusted chose the candidate who is anything but a career politician. While it might be popular to bring up emigrating now that the worst has happened what we could do is dig in and hold our ‘public servants’ to standards that will bring the real change we need in the U.S. Mr Trump albeit the next President is just one man let’s show him who we are.

    November 9, 2016
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      Once the shock wears out we will have to get to work and help mop up the mess.

      November 9, 2016
      |Reply
  12. I am feeling sick and stunned, and i am not even American. Such a sad sad day

    November 9, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      Really sad for all

      November 9, 2016
      |Reply

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