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Louise Bourgeois – the dark side of feminine

Posted in Things We Love

louise-bourgeois-portrait-photo-jeremy-pollard-copyright-1Sometimes I bookmark art that I see in magazines, or online, for future exploration. Most of the time, what piqued my interest in passing, on closer inspection, doesn’t end up moving me but, when I dig deeper, and find more about an artist who caught my eye and I fall in love with what I see, it’s like happening on a wonderful book you had never heard of.

The Giant Spider outside the Tate in London
The Giant Spider outside the Tate in London

I had heard of Loiuse Bourgeois, of course, but, thinking about her work, I don’t think I could have come up with more than the giant spider that pops up, with regularity, on Instagram of all places. All of a sudden, a few weeks after I set aside an image of three bright red heads, I see Louise Bourgeois mentioned everywhere, probably because a monumental retrospective catalogue, containing all of her work, has just been published.

This is what caught my eye
This is what caught my eye

Born in France but exquisitely New Yorker, Bourgeois is often mentioned in the same breath as De Kooning, Rothko and Pollock although she never exhibited as part of a defined movement.

A sculpture and a painter, I find her work to be both sensual and dark, aggressive and feminine.

louise bourgeoisHer first field of study was mathematics, which might account for the precision in her work. “I got peace of mind, only through the study of rules nobody could change.” Subsequently she studied art at the Beaux Arts.

louise bourgeoisThe daughter of a lifelong philanderer, her father’s infidelities proved to be an inspiration. While she never thought of her art as feminist (my work deals with problems that are pre-gender. For example, jealousy is not male or female) there is no denying her work is very feminine.

louise bourgeoisMarried to an American, Bourgeois relocated to New York, where her career blossomed, with a first retrospective in 1982 at MOMA. She died in 2010 after having lived most of her life in her beloved Chelsea apartment.

 

 

 

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5 Comments

  1. I agree on Loiuse Bourgeois’ work being undeniably feminine, and I never knew she had studied mathematics. As an engineering major, it gives me hope that I will one day be able to contribute at least a little bit of beauty to the world, instead of condos or air conditioners.

    October 21, 2016
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      Well, go ahead and design a sleek (and environmentally friendly air conditioner) and I will be the first in line to buy it (also, you will become enormously wealthy). Jokes aside, while I don’t have a scientific background, I never thought I could have the opportunity to be creative. And here I am, writing away. Making a living and creativity turned out not to be mutually exclusive.

      October 21, 2016
      |Reply
  2. silvia
    silvia

    What’s wrong with me today? Camparigirl of course. Anyway kisses and hugs to both of you

    October 21, 2016
    |Reply
  3. silvia
    silvia

    Great choice sofagirl. That body hanged in space is outstanding

    October 21, 2016
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      My favorite piece too.

      October 21, 2016
      |Reply

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