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The woman card

Posted in Life & Love, and Women's issues

Hillary Clintony She came on stage wearing a long, white organza jacket over black pants and a smile that could not be contained. She was beaming, savoring the historical moment, proud even. And why shouldn’t she?  Hillary Rodham Clinton will be the very first female nominee of a major political party to the Presidency of the United States. It has taken long enough.

I was trying to explain it to a man who doesn’t seem to get what the fuss is all about, who insists that gender, race or faith should not play a role in how we pick a President. All true but what the law legislates, real life doesn’t always allow. Imagine if, from the day you had memory, you had never seen a man ascend to the Presidency, I asked him. How would you feel if it finally happened?

I wouldn’t vote for a woman for the sole fact she possesses a vagina (hello, Sarah Palin) but all things being equal, between two candidates I respect and am comfortable with, I am going with the girl. Because it is time. So, yes, I suppose there is a woman card at play here but I see no shame in playing it.

It feels like an achievement. I realize it’s generational, that it carries more weight for me than, say, for my step-daughter, because I came of age when equality was a still a bit of a chimera on many levels, especially where I grew up, in Italy.  Not all of us fought grand battles but all of us fought quotidian ones, and, by doing so, we slowly changed our lives and the lives of other women. Let’s pat ourselves on the back, shall we? If Mrs. Clinton becomes President it will be because she has worked towards this for many years, with diligence and doggedness, but also because of all of us who stood up for ourselves, who stood up for those who couldn’t, and wouldn’t let go.

They say that when you meet her, Mrs. Clinton is personable, engaging and a phenomenal listener with a dry sense of humor. She is also intensely private and, lacking the communication gifts of her husband, less likable through a tv screen. But do we judge her more harshly and with different standard we would a male candidate?

I have issues with some of Mrs. Clinton’s opacity and her default mode of covering things up when caught with her hand in the cookie jar. None of her “scandals” have been that scandalous but her efforts to cover them up render them more vulnerable to prolonged scrutiny. But I also believe there is nobody who is smarter, more committed or better prepared to take the reins of this country than she is.

I look at Mrs. Clinton, at 68, ready to make a difference, to serve, to follow her ambition and there is a lesson there for all of us. What can we still accomplish? And who is there to stop us?

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12 Comments

  1. As I think you know, I am a Bernie fan (not a Bernie Or Buster as many Hillary fans label anyone NotWithHer) and I see his plan now being to move to bring everyone together without sacrificing all the work he has done to open up discussion on massive problems in this country. I just remain in awe of his dedication to do good, and really lead the country boldly. Instead we have Hillary. My idealistic notion of an America––one that could match other countries for innovation through easier access to education, one that values the health of its citizens enough to offer healthcare rather than war, one whose leader isn’t so far out of touch that she understands that to many families the difference between $12 versus $15 per hour is life changing… is shot. As a woman, who is a feminist, I feel no affinity for her simply because she’s so far removed from what Bernie represented which to me was all that was worth believing in. But there we have it. She’s in. This might be the only post you’ve made that I don’t have anything positive to say about. Which is sad––as a woman. I wish I were celebrating too.

    June 12, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      I live in a family divided, where pretty much everyone else voted for Bernie but me. I was pressured, teased and provoked all along this goddamn long primary season but stuck to my guns. I love Bernie, and I love what he has done for the party and for having moved Hillary to the left. There are some issues I don’t see eye to eye with her, especially her hawkish view of foreign policy. Still, because I think we know so much about her, there is so much to criticize and distort, I really believe she got a much rougher ride. Bernie, in all his honesty, is just not pragmatic enough and his Senate record proves it. Not much has been accomplished (and his position of guns makes me mad). I also had a utopian vision of what the US could be. Maybe I am more easily swayed because I come from the country of corruption and wealing and dealing when it comes to politics, and I expect some dirt to stick. And it doesn’t bother me. I still think Hillary wants the best for the country, more or less along the lines of what I want, and she certainly will keep on working tirelessly for women.

      June 14, 2016
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  2. Hillary had very high approval ratings when she wasn’t running (as a senator and the SoS). It’s as if the very act of of being ambitious is a negative. It’s tough seeing her constantly dragged through the mud but she’s tough. She has to be. It’s been thirty plus years of hatred. I think it’s interesting that a liberal radical hated by the right is somehow now, the “same as Trump” according to the Bernie or Bust crowd. Please.

    June 12, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      I really think she had a rough ride. I can’t say I agree on everything on her platform but do we ever agree on everything with the candidates we support? I think she really deserves to be where she is. May she not screw it up.

      June 14, 2016
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  3. camparigirl
    camparigirl

    And how cool if Elizabeth Warren were on the ticket? Too much to hope I suppose.

    June 10, 2016
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  4. I am sad – that the argument ‘for’ Hillary in part has to do with what she has achieved – in ‘spite of ‘ or in addition to tackling the challenge as a woman.
    I am sad and disappointed because there are many women who have accomplished just as much with similar issues in the same time period – but those are women I respect – worth respecting.
    It is not because Hillary is a women that she lacks support it is because she was given the opportunity and she did no more than just act like the common politician, very sad – and a significant missed opportunity

    June 10, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      I believe there is some truth in what you say but she is the one who had the means, the tenacity and the willingness to put herself up for unprecedented scrutiny.

      June 10, 2016
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  5. Yeah – go, Hillary! I’m not American, but if I was she would have my vote. She’s a lady who has stood her ground and walked that distance for many years already, and not always in the shadows. I think America will benefit from having a determined and intelligent woman in charge. I sit on the other side of the world, watching and waiting in hope…

    June 10, 2016
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    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      You better hope and pray or Australia will see a sudden influx of immigration from the United States. Countries were English is spoken are much sought after right now!

      June 10, 2016
      |Reply
  6. Winston Moreton
    Winston Moreton

    Word perfect. Again.

    June 10, 2016
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      Thank you.

      June 10, 2016
      |Reply

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