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The changing shape of beauty

Posted in Beauty, and Life & Love

Bette MidlerI caught myself staring at a naked picture of Kim Kardashian. Ok, maybe hard to avoid but, even worse, I got tangled into reading celebrities’ and commoners’ tweets in response to the picture (that old fox of Bette Midler was the funniest: “Kim Kardashian tweeted a nude selfie today. If Kim wants us to see a part of her we’ve never seen, she’s gonna have to swallow the camera).

Kim, who can’t take a joke – or two – proceeded to fight back and there I was, sopping it all up. But, before I gave in to my basest instincts, I took a moment to study Kim’s naked body, a year old bathroom selfie, maybe released to fill a slow publicity week: it is an extremely personal ideal of beauty, achieved thanks to money and more than one cosmetic surgeon.

Not that I am surprised. Wasn’t it Pamela Anderson who moved this trend out of the porn industry into the mainstream, back in the 1980s? A pretty girl hailing from Canada remade herself into a bikini sex-symbol, cashing in under the pretense of acting.

My point is not to criticize women who, of their own free will, monetize their attributes, fake or otherwise; nor to condemn cosmetic surgery. Live and let live right? If one body part erodes your self-esteem, why not change it? But, looking at Kim Kardashian’s unnatural physique, I thought we might be standing at a cultural and ethical crossroad.

With the recent and galloping advances in the genetic field, parents can already choose the sex of their unborn, as well as eye color and height. Techniques that were pioneered to remove or tinker with faulty genes that lead to terrible diseases, can be applied to alter physical traits too. Given the chance, what parent wouldn’t want their offsprings to be the smartest, healthiest…and prettiest?

Will we end up a society of homologated and similar-looking humans, with straight noses, long legs and perfect teeth? Or will this culture of reality tv and instant stardom spawning a desire to look like someone else, someone famous finally implode, paving the way for a return to nature doing its work?

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7 Comments

  1. There will always be this exaggerated version of femininity, I think. When it’s waved like this in my face, I will react. I don’t like it and I’ll let it be known. No I am not crushing the feminist movement by doing so. And to me, it’s not a form of feminism, or being happy in your own skin or any of that shit that likeminded appearance-obsessed brainless women spewed out afterwards. Pink made a nice response. Bette’s made me spit my tea out! Photos like this are a base cry for attention from someone who knows tits and ass are all they’ve got and the creeping worry that some day soon people won’t want to see them. Then what?

    March 12, 2016
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    • WordPress.com Support
      WordPress.com Support

      Can that day come soon?? Because if I started to notice, it means it’s pervaded every level.

      March 13, 2016
      |Reply
  2. It really is sad that beauty nowadays is “nipped and tucked” all the way. I’m lucky enough not to feel inadequate most days, but what could I do to change the fact that I have curves and am 5’1″? Would my parents change anything if they were offered the chance when I was in the womb? Would I change my weird trait of being born a blonde and blue-eyed to two brown-eyed and brown-haired parents, just to fit in?

    In the end, I do understand wanting to look good – the question is, what will that mean in 20 years?…

    March 11, 2016
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      I watched this documentary on Vice tv that freaked me out, about how gene modifications can easily be applied to physical traits. What is scary is there is no legislation or a body of ethics to regulate any of that. Eventually, it will not be that expensive either.

      March 11, 2016
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      • Eventually, there’ll be regulation – still won’t make it right, though, I don’t think…

        March 12, 2016
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  3. How anyone can find her body beautiful is beyond me, there is nothing natural about her at all. Love the Bette Midler comment.

    March 11, 2016
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      She is just so funny. The comment started a war from KK….

      March 11, 2016
      |Reply

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