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(5) Things we love…#54

Posted in Things We Love

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J.Crew – I was rather harsh on Jenna Lyons a couple of years ago, when I wrote her an open letter complaining of the scarcity of garments someone like me – her ideal customer – could choose from. Now, every time I receive J Crew’s catalogue, I must restrain myself from whipping out the credit card and start ordering. So many pretty and easy things for the Summer!

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ArtTate Modern in London is about to open a retrospective on Barbara Hepworth. A contemporary of Henry Moore, Dame Hepworth might not be a household name but the sculptures she produced during a career that spanned 4 decades, starting in 1930s, pepper many cities on both sides of the Atlantic and they represent the epitome of modernism. Almost entirely devoid of sharp angles, Hepworth’s sculptures always struck me as visceral, primal works that began as gut feelings.

The jacuzzi at Canyon Ranch Spa
The jacuzzi at Canyon Ranch Spa

Pampering – Spas are indulgences I hardly yield to. And I am so very wrong, I thought, as I bobbled in a jacuzzi at the Canyon Ranch Spa in Las Vegas a few days ago. While it’s nice to get extravagant treatments once in a while (I had a micro-dermal abrasion facial), it’s much cheaper and just as much fun to invest a modest sumo n a day pass (most are around $25) and use the facilities, with either a like-minded girlfriend or alone. I sweated in the sauna, frolicked in the jacuzzi, shivered in the rainforest mist (!) and took a long shower, followed by the slathering of every single product available – all the while drinking tea and munching on pears and apples. Four hours later, I felt new.

sheryl sandberg david goldbergStrong women – If you are one of the ten people who hasn’t yet read the essay on grief Sheryl Sandberg posted on her Facebook page, I invite you to do so here. Thirty days after the sudden death of her husband, the “Lean In” author is coming to grip with the permanent void in her life. It’s also a great lesson on how to deal with other people’s grief: those odd times when you would like to be of help and don’t quite know what to say or do. We never get over losing a loved one – yes, the pain becomes bearable, things do get better but it’s a matter of readjusting life around the hole and the scarring that never disappear.
eb white noteHow to say no – My friend Luisa pointed out that, if someone asks me for help, I am pretty much incapable of saying no. I can refuse people but not if they ask for help. This might sound noble but, sometimes, it leaves me scrambling for time and patience. Spotted on Austin Kleon’s newsletter were some literary examples on how to say no: my favorite happens to be E.B. White’s. It reminded me I don’t have to have a reason for my refusal or, at the very least, I am not obligated to share it.

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6 Comments

  1. camparigirl
    camparigirl

    You know,moor the longest time I didn’t even know that piece was hers! I believe the exhibition runs from June 21 until October. Bit jealous you will be in London!

    June 6, 2015
    |Reply
  2. It’s always hard to say no without making some sort of qualifying statement about why. Thanks for the reminder that it’s ok just to say ‘no, that won’t work for me’ and leave it at that. Have a terrific weekend. 🙂

    June 6, 2015
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      I will have to practice the no explanation method but am determined to try! Great weekend to you too

      June 6, 2015
      |Reply
  3. I know a couple of people who have lost loved ones this past week, so Sheryl Sandberg’s essay has come at a good time. Just the other day, I was talking to a friend about what to say to someone who’s lost a loved one because she was so scared of saying the wrong thing. I think I’ll share this with her.

    June 6, 2015
    |Reply
    • camparigirl
      camparigirl

      Sometimes we don’t say anything for fear of saying the wrong thing. In truth, a simple how are you sounds so out of place. That is why practical help is often welcome. Am a big proponent of that. Not many people are so open as Ms Sandberg to talking about grief.

      June 6, 2015
      |Reply

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